Home-based Business Organizing Tip #7: Recycling (How is it supposed to help me feel better about purging my things?..)

I was working with a client not too long ago and as we were going through his things, he had a hard time parting with some of the things that he clearly did not have a use for anymore.  After sharing with him some ideas of what he could do with them and the impact it could make, he began to see the idea of purging differently and was able to let go.  You see, sometimes we have a hard time with the idea that we just have to let some things go that we may not want to, no matter how much simpler it would make our lives.  We feel like there could be a “possibility” that we would need them at some point or we have some type of emotional attachment to them.  In turn, the process of purging has somewhat adopted a bad rep.  So instead of looking at it as if you are losing something, look at it for what it really is… a gain.  There’s many options besides throwing things in the trash.  But let’s face it, if you’ve been holding on to things that can realistically be replaced then it’s just time to give it up.  On the other hand, some of your items can benefit another person who could really use it as a donation.  Then there’s some items that can make an even bigger impact through recycling.  There’s many things that we use, whether it’s related to business or in our homes, that can be recycled… some of which we didn’t know could be recycled.  So in today’s tip, I’m providing a list of some of the common things I’ve found we as entrepreneurs should recycle… and even some things we should not.

Home-based Business Organizing Tip #7: Recycling

Paper (recycle)*

  • That morning paper (for those of us who still get them)
  • The continuous flow of computer, typing (for those of us who still do it), and writing paper
  • Mail fliers
  • Those old subscription magazines/catalogues
  • Still brown-bagging those lunches?  Yep, those bags should be recycled also.
  • Corrugated boxes
  • Paperboard boxes (the ones without the plastic windows)

*If you can not shred the paper items, place them in brown paper bags.  Be sure to remove staples or paper clips.  Flatten any boxes.

Paper (unrecyclable… toss it.)

  • Wrapping/tissue paper
  • Telephone books (yep, we still get those)
  • Paperboard boxes with the plastic windows

Metal (recycle)*

  • Aerosol cans
  • Aluminum foil/cans
  • Alkaline, rechargeable, watch and camera batteries

*Rinse the items clean and remove labels.  Make sure cans are completely empty and remove any caps.  Place batteries in a re-sealable bag.

Metal (unrecyclable… toss it.)

  • Paint cans
  • Clothes hangers
  • House siding, window frames and doors

Glass (recycle)*

  • Clear glass bottles/jars

*Discard the lids and rinse the items clean.  Remove the metal rings, plastic or foam labels (with the exception of paper labels)

Glass (unrecyclable… toss it.)

  • Dishes/ceramics
  • Light bulbs
  • Broken windows
  • Mirrors

Plastic (recycle)*

  • #1-7 containers (check for the symbol)
  • #2 and #4 grocery bags (check for the symbol)
  • Plastic items include such items as: milk jugs, water bottles, detergent, shampoo bottles, butter tubs, plastic yogurt cups, microwave food trays, plant flats, and flower pots

*Discard caps and rinse the items clean of food and drink residue.  Be sure that the plastic bags are dry and free of paper/receipts.

Plastic (unrecyclable… toss it.)

  • Bottles that can hazardous materials
  • Styrofoam cups, plants, peanuts, packaging, etc.
  • Garbage bags
  • Food storage bags
  • Dry cleaning bags/plastic film

So now you can feel better about parting with your items because of your contribution to preserving our resources.  You can smile now.

I hope this tip helped to motivate you to reconsider some of the things that you’ve been holding on to.  Now share it with others or feel free to share some of your recycling tips below.

Sy

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